Ventnor Heritage Centre

"To Collect, Record and preserve the rich heritage and history of Ventnor and surrounding villages, and share it with local and wider communities"

Ventnor Heritage Centre Monthly Meetings |

Ventnor Heritage Centre Monthly Meetings

The speakers cover a wide range of topics and focus on the history of Ventnor, surrounding area and the Isle of Wight. Meetings are very well attended and are held at the Masonic Hall in Grove Road, Ventnor, starting at 7.30 pm.  Entry is free to members of the Society,  visitors are very welcome, entrance is £2.00

Upcoming Meetings for 2019:

25th January              Robin McInnes                       The Most Painted Place – Bonchurch

22nd February           Susan Weeks                          At Home With the Spartali Family

29th March                 Annual General Meeting        Followed by Filmshow

26th April                    Richard Downing                    Ventnor Breweries

31st May                     Film: ‘Ventnor – No Finer Place’ (please note change from previously published talk)

28th June                    Andy Butler                             A Naturalist’s Year (please note change from previously published talk)

26th July                     Donna Needham                    Around the Island in 115(ish) Churches

27th September          Brian Greening                       Island Life 100 Years Ago

25th October                Andy Butler                           Title to be confirmed

29th November            Mark Earp                              Queen Victoria on the Isle of Wight

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all our past guest speakers for sharing their time and knowledge with us.

A Society Meeting


Exhibitions, stories, images . . .

Ventnor Carnivals

Ventnor’s first carnival in 1889 was a torchlight procession of ladies and gentlemen in fancy dress, followed by a Masquerade Ball. It was such a success that it became an annual event, attracting crowds of thousands. So each August, the town comes to a standstill to enjoy a parade of music and elaborate costumes with tableaux created by local groups and businesses, and a Carnival Queen chosen for the year and paraded round the town with her retainers. However there has always been another, more subversive side to 'Carnival’. Those taking part can step outside their day to day lives and turn the world upside down, dressing up, assuming different characters, and poking fun at established order and authority. It is a feast of dressing up, foolery, and music, perhaps best symbolised by the much loved Ventnor Comic Jazz Band. Our publication 'Ventnor Carnival', traces the colourful history of the event, and is available from the Heritage Centre and online from  Ventnor Heritage Centre Publications.

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