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Bath Road Ventnor

The road from Belgrave Road to the Esplanade was named Bath Road. The reason for this was as a result of the common belief in Victorian times that salt water was a cure for everything from bruises to hysteria. A ‘bathhouse’ had been constructed at the western end of the esplanade for patrons of the… read more »

2022 Calendars – price now reduced

Our beautiful 2022 Calendars which contain some unique local and district prints are now on sale at the reduced price of £5.50. A lovely souvenir to keep or to send. Available only in our online shop, the spiral-bound calendar has a good quality gloss cover and silk-finish pages.  Each double-page covers one month with an… read more »

Station Memories

From the late 1920s travellers and staff alike would have sought the warmth of the Refreshment Room at Ventnor Station to escape the wintry weather. Over the years there were several different proprietors. Initially run by the Dixon family of Mitchell Avenue, it subsequently was run at different times by the Channings, (Gwen along with… read more »

Museum Exhibition: ‘Before they were famous’

This exhibition highlights some of the live bands appearing on stage at Ventnor Winter Gardens in the 1960s who went on to become household names. In June 1965 these included The Who, as well as the Moody Blues and the Pretty Things. And the following month the support band for Johnny Kidd and the Pirates… read more »

Museum Exhibition: Ventnor’s Russian visitors in the 1860s

Between 1855-1880, Ventnor became the summer home of many of Russia’s leading political radicals, writers, and poets, men and women who helped shape a new future for Russia in opposition to the Imperial Romanov regime. This exhibition highlights some of these visitors, including Alexander Herzen, described as ‘The Father of Russian Socialism’, who stayed in… read more »

A Ventnor Childhood in WW2 by Marigold Harding – Part 1: Home Life

Marigold Harding was ten when WW2 broke out.  Her family lived at the foot of Nine Stone Steps, where her father, builder Tom Harding, ran the ‘Trinity Works’.  This is the first of three articles using her memories of a wartime childhood in Ventnor, and mentions home and school life during the war, and Vivian… read more »

New book now available

We are pleased to announce that our new, long awaited, book, Ventnor and the Undercliff, in Search of Lost Time, is now published and available in our online shop, The 160 pages span the years from 1860 to 1950, with more than 180 black and white images drawn from the Society’s archive as well as… read more »

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